On The Etymology Of Airavata – The Elephant Of Indra

Airavata is the Vahana ['Steed/Mount/Vehicle'] of Lord Indra; and with a rather apt etymology to connect it to the Thunderer. It effectively works out as 'Rain-bearing Cloud' ; which is rather apt, given that a stormcloud is, of course, large, grey, and may make a thunderous noise ['Garja'] … like an Elephant (indeed, गर्ज can … Continue reading On The Etymology Of Airavata – The Elephant Of Indra

Salutations To The Shivas – Glorious Modern Hindu Art Of MahaDeva & Devi, And The Uma Maheshwara Stotram Of Adi Shankara

Beautiful art of Lord Shiva & Devi, by Tanushree Ghosh Goes rather nicely with Adi Shankara's Uma Maheshwara Hymnal: नमः शिवाभ्यां नवयौवनाभ्यांपरस्पराश्लिष्टवपुर्धराभ्याम् ।नगेन्द्रकन्यावृषकेतनाभ्यांनमो नमः शङ्करपार्वतीभ्याम् ॥ 1 ॥ Salutations to Lord Shiva and Goddess Shiva,Who are always in a fresh stage of youth,Who cling to each other in a tight embrace,Of whom one is the … Continue reading Salutations To The Shivas – Glorious Modern Hindu Art Of MahaDeva & Devi, And The Uma Maheshwara Stotram Of Adi Shankara

‘Mother And Motherland Are Higher Than Heaven’ – An Arya Akasha Analysis Of A Beauteous Maxim

'Mother And Motherland Are Higher Than Heaven' - An Arya Akasha Analysis Of A Maxim Today marks Republic Day in India. जय हिंद ! The dual commemorations it is keyed to being the promulgation of India's Constitution in 1950, and the declaration by the Indian National Congress in 1930 of their intent to fight for … Continue reading ‘Mother And Motherland Are Higher Than Heaven’ – An Arya Akasha Analysis Of A Beauteous Maxim

Dyaus; Deva, Deus, Tyr: Many Gods, One Sky Father

Despite His centrality to our mythology, the Indo-European Sky Father is probably one of the most misunderstood Gods of our pantheon(s). You will semi-regularly hear people make all manner of outlandish claims about Him. The most common of which tend to be either that the Sky Father 'withered away' and was superceded by another God or … Continue reading Dyaus; Deva, Deus, Tyr: Many Gods, One Sky Father

On ‘Moon’ And Moon God – A Brief Comparative Of Several Major Indo-European Religions

It is MONDAY - quite literally "Moon['s] Day"; and therefore, a brief look at the names for the Indo-European Moon God in various descendant languages and faith-groupings. Now, note that I said "Moon God" - I have not included any Moon Goddesses, as these are largely restricted to the Greek & Roman mythologies, perhaps as … Continue reading On ‘Moon’ And Moon God – A Brief Comparative Of Several Major Indo-European Religions

“Einu nafni hétumk aldregi / síz ek með folkum fór” – “By one name I have never been known / since I went among the people”

Earlier this week, one of our associates - who's a good guy, although we don't always agree - put up a thought about comparative Indo-European theology. It included the following:  "All IE religions have a sky father, Earth mother and twin Gods. But, that doesn't mean those Gods aren't sovereign entities, uniquely different from their … Continue reading “Einu nafni hétumk aldregi / síz ek með folkum fór” – “By one name I have never been known / since I went among the people”

‘Time And I Against Any Other Two’ – an Indo-European analysis of a maxim. 

There is an aphorism of the great Baltasar Gracian which I have been turning over in my mind a fair bit this week. Not least because, upon closer inspection there's some *strongly* Indo-European [and, although Gracian could not possibly have known it, Shaivite - Shakta] subtext immanent within it. I shall not repeat it in full … Continue reading ‘Time And I Against Any Other Two’ – an Indo-European analysis of a maxim.