On The Wind-Walk Of Aristeas Of Proconnesus As Mythic-Metaphoric-Metempsychotic Journey

[Author's Note: This piece, examining the legendary journey of Aristeas of Proconnesus across Scythia, is an extract from my earlier "The Gryphon – Indo-European Guardian of the Golden Realm". I felt that it was of sufficient import and general interest to publish separately as well - and may further expand the concepts it touches upon … Continue reading On The Wind-Walk Of Aristeas Of Proconnesus As Mythic-Metaphoric-Metempsychotic Journey

The Gryphon – Indo-European Guardian of the Golden Realm

One of the more seizing figures to have captured the imagination - both ancient and modern - is the Griffin (occasionally, and to my mind superiorly, spelled 'Gryphon'). Almost everybody knows it - a creature that is simultaneously leonine and aquiline. Part Lion, part Eagle. And usually pictured by us in its heraldic form, something … Continue reading The Gryphon – Indo-European Guardian of the Golden Realm

On Pausanias At Plataea And Dost Mohammed In Afghanistan – The Recurrence Of The Incomprehensibility Of Imperial Over-Extension

I'm writing something atm that's tangentially to do with the First Anglo-Afghan War; and in the course of my research, happened across this quote from the eventual victor of the conflict, Dost Mohammed: He said of the British - "I have been struck by the magnitude of your resources, your ships, your arsenals, but what … Continue reading On Pausanias At Plataea And Dost Mohammed In Afghanistan – The Recurrence Of The Incomprehensibility Of Imperial Over-Extension

Yama Iamso Coin of the Kushans, And What This Means For Central Asian Indo-European Religion – Arte-Facts #7

I've had this coin in my head for some days now - a golden coin of the Kushan king Huviska (who appears on the obverse), featuring what appears to be Yama on the deity side. Why? Because of the iconography with which Yama - here hailed as 'Iamso' - is displayed. He's holding a Spear … Continue reading Yama Iamso Coin of the Kushans, And What This Means For Central Asian Indo-European Religion – Arte-Facts #7

The Radiant Queen of the Heavens – On Scythian Tabiti As Template For The Greater Indo-European Solar Goddess [Part 1 – The Figurative Eclipse And Unconquered Re-Emergence Of The Solar Goddess Deific]

It is one of those curious little mysteries of our sphere - how particular portions of the Indo-European mythology have changed and shifted to acquire the now entrenched archetypal connotations we are so familiar with today ... especially in those areas wherein the modern perception of things is so clearly at odds with how things … Continue reading The Radiant Queen of the Heavens – On Scythian Tabiti As Template For The Greater Indo-European Solar Goddess [Part 1 – The Figurative Eclipse And Unconquered Re-Emergence Of The Solar Goddess Deific]

The Scythian Idanthyrsus As Fundamentally Indo-European Man

As is widely-known by now, one of my favourite portions of Herodotus' Persian Wars is the exchange between the Scythian king Idanthyrsus, and Darius the would-be world-emperor. There are some obvious reasons why this is so, and in previous posts I have gone into some detail explicating them. But for today, I thought we would … Continue reading The Scythian Idanthyrsus As Fundamentally Indo-European Man

The Indo-European Man – Sons of the Sun [Part III]: Zoroastrian Yima – The Death of Manu

Now, heading immediately to the west of Aryavarta, and quite likely some time later - we encounter the first 'degenerated' (or, perhaps more kindly, 'differently-emphatic') iteration of the above mythic typology. Amongst the Zoroastrians, they too have a 'Vivanhat', and a 'Yima'. Although the arrangement of facts is, in a number of particulars quite different. … Continue reading The Indo-European Man – Sons of the Sun [Part III]: Zoroastrian Yima – The Death of Manu

“An Image, Frozen In Time” – What Pazyryk Scythian Tombs Can Tell Us About Our Indo-European Ancestors

This is quite simply one of the most chad-looking images I have seen; a representation of one of the Scythian nobles buried at Pazyryk in the Siberian East, about two and a half thousand years ago. Now, the Pazyryk find itself is quite fascinating - in no small part because the freezing of the site … Continue reading “An Image, Frozen In Time” – What Pazyryk Scythian Tombs Can Tell Us About Our Indo-European Ancestors

A Message Even A Persian Could Understand

It has been said that the language of international diplomacy is one of subtle, implied threats delivered alongside cocktail-sticks, in foreign, exotic locales. This might seem an altogether modern maxim, yet as we shall soon see, it is one that is almost equally (if not, frequently, far further) applicable to the relations of the Ancient … Continue reading A Message Even A Persian Could Understand