A Brief Point On “Barbarian” Labelling In Sanskrit

Earlier, I'd been discussing with associates the curious co-occurrence of Barbaros / Barbara in Sanskrit and Ancient Greek respectively. This lead to the following - presented here for a broader audience.  "as applies the linguistics, I think from memory that earliest attested occurrences in Ancient Greek are some centuries prior to earliest attested occurrences in … Continue reading A Brief Point On “Barbarian” Labelling In Sanskrit

On Herakles As Thunderer – The Recollection Of The Weapon In The Classical Conceptual Sphere

There are a few falsehoods in our field which stubbornly refuse to die. One of them is this ongoing notion that Zeus Pater / Jupiter is somehow the Indo-European Striker/Thunderer deific … rather than the Sky Father, Dyaus Pitar, that is the Father of said God. We have earlier poured quite some effort into demonstrating … Continue reading On Herakles As Thunderer – The Recollection Of The Weapon In The Classical Conceptual Sphere

A Manifesto For The Resurrective Reincarnation Of The Loka-lized Indo-European Faith

What follows is not my own writing - although I have had a hand in editing it, and it has resulted from months of concordant conversations between myself and its major author, Aldo Rapace. We feel that it has come to a necessary stage in our Mission, to begin more openly discussing and working upon … Continue reading A Manifesto For The Resurrective Reincarnation Of The Loka-lized Indo-European Faith

The Heavy Illumination Of Etymology And Folk Etymology Comparatively Considered

Something I have just been thinking about is the etymology of 'Guru'. From PIE 'Gwrehus' ['Heavy'], same place as Latin 'Gravis', English 'Gravitas' [or 'Grave' in the sense of serious] Effectively, therefore, "One Whose Words Have Weight" Although it should also be noted that 'Guru' has a general sense in Sanskrit to refer not only … Continue reading The Heavy Illumination Of Etymology And Folk Etymology Comparatively Considered

Yama Iamso Coin of the Kushans, And What This Means For Central Asian Indo-European Religion – Arte-Facts #7

I've had this coin in my head for some days now - a golden coin of the Kushan king Huviska (who appears on the obverse), featuring what appears to be Yama on the deity side. Why? Because of the iconography with which Yama - here hailed as 'Iamso' - is displayed. He's holding a Spear … Continue reading Yama Iamso Coin of the Kushans, And What This Means For Central Asian Indo-European Religion – Arte-Facts #7

Votive Plate of Cybele, Great Goddess, Mountain Mother – Arte-Facts #5

This Is #GangSteppe - and also, fine Devi-otional (A)Art(I) for Friday ! Depicted is Goddess Cybele on an offering-plate, from 3rd century B.C. Ai-Khanoum, amidst the ruins of the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom. Now, I find this artefact fascinating for quite a number of reasons. Not simply because of the various iconographic features upon it which come … Continue reading Votive Plate of Cybele, Great Goddess, Mountain Mother – Arte-Facts #5

“MY HAT IS AN ELEPHANT – YOUR SOVEREIGNTY IS INVALID” – A Gandharan Coin of Demetrius I – Arte-Facts #4

Coin of the Indo-Greek ruler Demetrios I, from the first decade of the 2nd century B.C. The Elephant has long been considered a potent symbol of sovereignty and royal, even imperial power within the Indian/Dharmic iconographic lexicon. Hence, in part, why Lord Indra rides one [Airavata - 'Storm Cloud' ... the other major reason being … Continue reading “MY HAT IS AN ELEPHANT – YOUR SOVEREIGNTY IS INVALID” – A Gandharan Coin of Demetrius I – Arte-Facts #4

The “Buddhist” Coin Of Tilya Tepe – Arte-Facts #3

I've had this coin in my head for awhile now - and it seemed rather appropriate to post for a Wednesday. It's another of the artefacts from the justifiably famed Tilya Tepe burial-site in northern Afghanistan; a roughly two millennia old set of seven graves that are likely of Scythian origin, rediscovered in 1978. But … Continue reading The “Buddhist” Coin Of Tilya Tepe – Arte-Facts #3