Warrior-Women of the Steppe?

'Scythian' female horse archer; broadly representative of a perhaps surprisingly viable typology of the Indo-European folk of the Steppe. In my previous piece on Naga Panchami, I briefly mentioned the flawed speculative etymology of Sauromatai, the Sarmatians - noting that some had sought to suggest it derived from scale-like armour and serpentine standards of this … Continue reading Warrior-Women of the Steppe?

GHOST DIVISION – On The BhutaGana of Mahadev & The Einherjar of Odin

GHOST DIVISION - On The BhutaGana of Mahadev & The Einherjar of Odin [Author's Note: This piece was initially intended as an offering for MahaShivRatri, which was this year in early March. A combination of delays in the writing and peer-review process - for which I take full responsibility - meant that it was not … Continue reading GHOST DIVISION – On The BhutaGana of Mahadev & The Einherjar of Odin

Indo-European Origins, Part II: The Nordic, Kurgan, and Anatolian Theories

As Alain de Benoist has noted, there are two main schools of thought on the Indo-European urheimat (homeland): one which derives the Indo-Europeans from the North, and another which brings them from South Russia (and ultimately the Near East). Suprà: Zones of Indo-European origin proposed by scholars over the 19–20th centuries, showing a trend toward … Continue reading Indo-European Origins, Part II: The Nordic, Kurgan, and Anatolian Theories

The Origin of the Indo-Europeans, Part I: Early Theories

The scientific study of the Indo-European language family is generally dated to 1786, when Sir William Jones read his famous paper before the Asiatic Society of Calcutta, which includes these immortal lines: ‘The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and … Continue reading The Origin of the Indo-Europeans, Part I: Early Theories